GLUTATHIONE & THE FLU VIRUS

CLINICAL RESEARCH FINDINGS

Glutathione & The Flu Clinical Studies

RESEARCH ON GLUTATHIONE & INFLUENZA

There is a steady flow of scientific papers testing individual ingredients of the Original Glutathione Formula™ with the influenza virus, some examples are as follows:


N-acetylcysteine (NAC) is derived from the amino acid L-cysteine and is an essential component of the antioxidant glutathione (GSH). Because NAC supplementation increases cellular GSH, it is frequently used in medicinal therapies for chronic respiratory bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cancers of the respiratory tract. Additionally, NAC has also been shown to reduce the progression of diseases caused by cellular oxidative stress.


In the research publication: "Attenuation of influenza-like symptomatology and improvement of cell-mediated immunity with long-term N-acetylcysteine treatment" a study of 262 subjects was conducted at multiple Italian health centers. The authors concluded that long-term NAC supplementation yielded little to no side effects and was well tolerated by the study participates. The symptoms of the H1N1 influenza virus were reduced in patients receiving NAC treatment, while the group administered placebo exhibited only a small reduction in their symptoms.


Summary: The study suggests that immune-compromised patients (such as those with HIV, cancer or other chronic illness such as diabetes) and the elderly would benefit from NAC supplementation through a reduction in the severity of influenza symptoms. While N-acetylcysteine did not prevent influenza infection, it clearly reduced the duration of influenza-like illness and the severity of associated symptoms.


Cordyceps is a mushroom that has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for thousands of years, with the first recorded medicinal use reported in a Tibetan medical text in the 15th century. Modern researchers have reported anti-cancerous and anti-oxidant properties and some evidence of a benefit for treating insulin resistance.


The research study: "Anti-influenza effect of Cordyceps militaris through immunomodulation in a DBA/2 mouse model" reported the evaluation of mice for a seven day period. The mice were provided with Cordyceps extract, red ginseng extract or water alone as a treatment for H1N1 influenza virus infection. The mice receiving Cordyceps extract exhibited reduced mortality and a stable body weight. The mice also were observed to have an increased number of NK (natural killer) cells, indicating a more robust immune response.


Summary: The findings of this study indicate that Cordyceps enhanced immunity at the cellular level and reduced the severity of influenza-associated symptoms.


Quercetin is a flavonoid derived from plants and is found in high concentrations in foods such as green tea, berries, radish leaves, dill, kale and other plant sources. It has been used for its medicinal properties since 1857 in the treatment of heart disease, high cholesterol, and inflammatory diseases including asthma, chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), gout and diabetes.


In the report "Effect of quercetin supplementation on lung antioxidants after experimental influenza virus infection" the impact of quercetin supplementation was measured in mice. The H3N2 influenza virus created a reduction in glutathione, superoxide dismutase (which protects the cell from oxidation), vitamin E, as well as catalase. Both glutathione and catalase are essential to protecting cells from oxidative damage, and immunity. The experimental group that received an oral dosage of quercetin were noted to have an increase in the pulmonary concentrations of catalase, glutathione and superoxide dismutase.


Summary: These findings suggest that quercetin supplementation reduces influenza-associated damage to the lung caused by oxidative stress.


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